Should I Be Eating… ?

food-index-165Choose from hundreds of foods, from almonds to zucchini, and find out their effects on your health.

Find out the hidden health benefits in your favorite foods. Browse the index from A to Z and discover the powerful nutrients, vitamins, and minerals each food contains — plus the medical conditions and concerns these foods can help treat.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T V W Y Z
  • Waffles, Whole-Grain
    Whole-grain waffles are a healthy choice for breakfast, especially when paired with a protein-rich food like yogurt or peanut butter. Unlike regular waffles made with refined white flours, whole-grain waffles provide a good dose of fiber. A high-fiber diet is beneficial for weight loss and reduces the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Just be sure to stick to the portion size listed on the label (usually two waffles) and avoid dousing them in butter and sugary syrup. Most whole-grain waffles on the market contain whole-wheat flour and therefore are not gluten-free, so if you have celiac disease be sure to rea...
    Read more about whole grains
  • Walnut Oil
    Walnut oil is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to reduce inflammation, decrease triglycerides, and may help to lower high blood pressure and raise good cholesterol. Omega-3s also help maintain healthy skin and may slow memory decline. Find out more about oils and fats.
    Read more about oils and fats
  • Walnuts
    Walnuts are a good source of heart-healthy monounsaturated and omega-3 fats, nutrients that can improve cardiovascular health, help to manage type 2 diabetes, prevent and manage arthritis, and maintain healthy eyes and skin. Manganese in walnuts may reduce PMS symptoms. Like other nuts, walnuts should be eaten in moderation since they're calorie-dense (stick with just one handful of nuts per day). Nuts may also trigger migraines and IBS in people who are sensitive.
    Read more about nuts and seeds
  • Watercress
    Watercress is a leafy green vegetable with a peppery flavor and is often added to salads or used on top of sandwiches. It is a good source of beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, antioxidants that may prevent and manage arthritis, cataracts, and macular degeneration, as well as maintain healthy hair and skin. Watercress is also a good source of vitamin K, which may prevent bone fractures.
    Read more about leafy green vegetables
  • Watermelon
    Watermelon, like other melons, has a high water content and is low in calories, making it a great choice for people who are trying to lose weight. Watermelon is a good source of vitamin C and beta-carotene, antioxidants found in many fruits that help prevent arthritis, cataracts, and macular degeneration, and maintain healthy hair and skin.
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  • Wheat Berries
    Wheat berries are the entire kernel of wheat (minus the hull); therefore, they are a high-quality whole grain that is rich in nutrients. Wheat berries have a chewy texture and nutty flavor, and they can be prepared like rice and served hot or cold as a side dish. Fibrous wheat berries help keep blood-sugar levels stable, which is helpful if you have type 2 diabetes or mood disorders. Wheat berries contain gluten and are therefore unsafe for individuals with celiac disease. IBS sufferers take note: Some people with IBS are sensitive to whole grains and other high-fiber foods and experience discomfort after eating them.
    Read more about whole grains
  • Wheat Germ
    Wheat germ is the nutrient-rich part of a grain of wheat that is lost during milling when grains are refined. Wheat germ is a very good source of the antioxidants vitamin E and selenium, B vitamins such as folate, and zinc — which in combination help reduce the risk of arthritis, cataracts and macular degeneration, memory loss, and skin and hair damage. Other nutrients in wheat germ, including magnesium and manganese, may help prevent and manage high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, migraine headaches, and PMS symptoms. Wheat germ is not gluten-free and is therefore unsafe for individuals with celiac d...
    Read more about whole grains
  • Whiskey
    Whiskey is a hard alcohol that is distilled from fermented grains. It is commonly consumed straight up or on ice but may also be mixed with other drinks. Either way, it can pack on the pounds (especially when combined with soda or other high-calorie, sugary mixers), increase already high triglycerides, and interfere with sleep. It is best to limit whiskey and other alcoholic beverages, especially if you are trying to lose weight, have type 2 diabetes or gout, or experience irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). That said, drinking moderate amounts of alcohol has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke and bo...
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  • White Potatoes
    White potatoes are starchy, root vegetables that provide a good amount of fiber (especially when eaten with the skin), which helps lower cholesterol, reduces risk of type 2 diabetes, stabilizes mood and keeps you feeling full, thereby helping with weight loss. Potatoes are a good source of potassium, a mineral that may help lower blood pressure and preserve bone health. The antioxidant vitamin C in potatoes may help prevent and manage arthritis pain, as well as keep your skin, hair, and eyes healthy.
    Read more about starchy vegetables
  • White Rice
    White rice is produced by milling whole-grain brown rice to remove the bran and germ. During the milling process, rice loses most of the fiber and nutrients that it originally contained, so it’s always better to choose whole-grain brown or wild rice. If you have type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high triglycerides, or arthritis, it’s especially important to limit white rice and other refined grains. However, since white rice is very low in fiber, it can be a good option if you suffer from diarrhea-predominant IBS, and all rice is also a gluten-free grain that can be enjoyed if you have celiac disease.
    Read more about refined grains
  • White Wine
    Heavy intake of white wine, like other alcoholic beverages, can pack on the pounds, increase already high triglycerides, and interfere with sleep. It is best to limit white wine and other alcoholic beverages, especially if you are trying to lose weight, have type 2 diabetes or gout, or experience irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). That said, drinking moderate amounts of alcohol has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke and boost HDL (good) cholesterol. If you don't already drink, don't start, and if you do, limit your intake to one drink per day for women or two per day for men. A five-ounce glass of w...
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  • Whole Milk
    Whole milk is not the best choice for most people concerned with various health conditions, not to mention that it can impede weight-loss efforts due to its high calorie content. Whole milk is high in saturated fat, which, when eaten in excess, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. It can also contribute to inflammation, which may increase the risk of arthritis, cataracts and macular degeneration, and memory loss. For overall health, choose skim milk (also known as fat-free) or 1 percent low-fat milk instead of whole or 2 percent fat milk. IBSsufferers take note: Some people with IBS are se...
    Read more about dairy
  • Wild Rice
    Wild rice is a whole grain that contains fiber, which helps keep blood-sugar levels stable and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. It is also a good source of vitamin B6, a B vitamin that may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Wild rice is gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease.
    Read more about whole grains
  • Winter Squash
    Winter squash is a category of starchy vegetables that includes acorn squash, butternut squash, and kabocha. Winter squash is a good source of potassium, vitamin B6, and the antioxidants beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, nutrients that help protect against cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and memory loss, as well as maintain skin, hair, and eye health.
    Read more about starchy vegetables